RESUMING THE STUDY

Comet Halley, which orbits the Sun approximately once every 76 years, is once again passing through the inner part of our solar system. As it passes near the planets Earth and Mars, we have the opportunity to study the comet from an Earth-orbiting spacecraft (the International Space Station (ISS).

Our mission begins with the transport of the astronaut crew to our spacecraft that is in low Earth orbit, about 250 miles above the surface of the Earth. As we search for Comet Halley, the crew will construct a space probe that can be launched through the gaseous tails of the comet to take close-up photos of the comet and collect materials for further analysis.

The goal of the mission is three-fold. First, the spacecraft must rendezvous with the comet. Next, the crew will launch the probe into its tail. Finally, the team must collect new data from the probe’s instruments.

The most recent opportunity we had to study Comet Halley from an Earth-orbiting vehicle was in the year 1986. At that time, five international unmanned space probes flew by or through the tail of the comet and relayed collected data to Earth. We planned to study Comet Halley during the January 1986 flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger. On January 28, 1986, Challenger and its crew were lost in an accident shortly after lift-off. In our Rendezvous with Comet Halley, we will continue the mission of Challenger’s crew by resuming the study of Halley’s Comet.

Rendezvous with Halley's Comet: $800 for a 2-hour mission in our simulator

Designed for students 5th grade and up.  We can accommodate groups of 16-30 students. See EVA tab for additional add on activities.

 

FOR A MISSION REGISTRATION FORM, CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW.

FOR A CREW MANIFEST FORM, CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW.